The National Emergencies Trust Funding

The National Emergencies Trust has £747K in match-funding available. This is money still unspent through the Local Action Fund. Up to £10K match-funding linked to crowd funding to launch new initiatives or continue existing services.

For more information visit the National Emergencies Trust website.

Local Action Fund Launches (nationalemergenciestrust.org.uk)

‘Vaxi Taxi’ scheme in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

Transport to your Covid-19 Vaccination appointment: ‘Vaxi Taxi’ Scheme

If you are struggling to get to and from your vaccine appointment, Cambridgeshire County Council have agreed to pay for your taxi journey.

Please ensure you have booked your appointment or if it is a walk-in clinic you know the date/time is correct at your nearest centre first before you book your transport.

All you need to do is to contact the relevant taxi service below within your area and give them a call to book your transport.  They will ask you to confirm details of the appointment when you book your journey.  Please note that you can make arrangements for them to drop you off and pick you up (but the return journey must start within 1 hour of your appointment time).  All children need to be accompanied by their parent/carer during the journey and at the vaccination site.

Visit the following Website COVID-19 vaccination – Cambridgeshire County Council

 

CAMBRIDGE CITY PETERBOROUGH HUNTINGDONSHIRE SOUTH CAMBS EAST CAMBS FENLAND
Cambs private Hire 01223971611 Uniqcars 07454331125 HUNTS TAXIS LTD 01480414500 Cambs private Hire 01223971611 Cambs private Hire 01223971611 Daddy Cabs Ltd 07752000550
MDS Executive chauffeurs ltd 079771 52004 Heer private hire 07872829297 Mohit Mohanan Nair 01480453085 MDS Executive chauffeurs ltd 079771 52004 JB Hire 07881228231 Uniqcars 07454331125
Uniqcars 07454331125 Uniqcars 07454331125 Uniqcars 07454331125 MDS Executive chauffeurs ltd 079771 52004 A2bTaxicabs 01353 66 10 10
A2bTaxicabs 01353 66 10 10 T365 private hire 01480 456548 505 Cars 01767650505 Burwell private hire 07876446962 Heer private hire 07872829297
Panther Taxis Ltd 01223 715715 GMC Travel 07946182477 079 Call a Cab (Cambourne & Surrounding areas only) 07922552222 Uniqcars 07454331125 The Private Hire Company +447860573604
A&B Taxis Ltd 01480 467846 Panther Taxis Ltd 01223 715715 Alan’s 07921482600
Fencabs Ltd 01353 669966
A2bTaxicabs 01353 66 10 10
Golden Eagle 07541994255
Ely Link Taxis 07429578474
Noble Cars 01353 699899

 

 

 

 

Police Commissioner requests views

POLICE and Crime Commissioner, Darryl Preston is today (Thursday, 6th January) asking people to give their views on his proposed increase to the policing part of council tax.

As Police and Crime Commissioner, it’s my job to set the budget for the Constabulary – part of that is about determining how much people contribute through their council tax.

The public’s views are important to me, therefore in order to enable people living and working in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough to tell me what matters to them when it comes to policing and crime, I am launching an online survey.

I appreciate that 2021 has been an exceptionally challenging year for all of us. Throughout the last twelve months, our police officers, volunteers and staff have worked tirelessly alongside our other emergency service workers to help keep people safe, whilst responding to the usual calls for service.

I recently launched my Police and Crime Plan for the county which responded to feedback from the public and sets policing objectives for the next three years. My Plan includes five key priorities including providing a more accessible Constabulary that responds to local issues such as rural and business crime, anti-social behaviour, drug related crimes and road safety.

Thanks to the contribution people made to policing through their council tax last year, (2021-22, £15 per year based on a Band D property), the Chief Constable has been able to invest in the following:

  • An additional 10 call handlers to help improve the 999 and 101 service;
  • A new 24/7 Digital and Social Media Contact Desk to respond to increased online communication from the public, providing quick oversight of comments written on all Force social media posts, looking for reports of crime, intelligence and safeguarding issues;
  • Early Intervention Domestic Abuse Desks with dedicated staff who provide safeguarding advice to officers at the scene of domestic incidents;
  • A new Inclusion Officer who is helping to build support and enhance trust in the force across all communities;
  • Digital Media Investigators within a newly created Cyber Crime Team to support frontline investigators and provide more support for victims;
  • Four Cyber and On-Line Fraud Prevention Officers to help reduce cybercrime and online fraud through awareness-raising and other initiatives.

For the 2022/23 financial year, as with others, it is important to clarify that police funding comes from two main sources: 56% from central government (excluding specific grants) and the remainder from the policing part of council tax.  Whilst I recognise that household costs are rising across the board, it is unfortunately no different for policing. Inflation and national insurance increases mean that there are considerable pressures on the Constabulary budget, despite savings of £5.1 million having been achieved in 2021/22.

As we plan the police budget for 2022/23, it is vital that we are able to meet rising costs and ensure the growth in new officers can be sustained so that the Constabulary’s commitment to supporting our communities, which includes local policing, is maintained.

In line with government guidance, I am therefore asking for people’s views on my proposed increase of £10 per year (83p per month based on a Band D property). This, together with an increase of £4.8m from government (excluding specific grants), would enable the Chief Constable to further maintain, invest and support in 3 core areas:

 

National Uplift Programme (Recruitment of 20,000 additional officers)

  • Recruitment and training of an additional 82 officers for 2022/23 which is on top of the Constabulary’s anticipated recruitment target to maintain workforce numbers. This brings the total number of officers in the county to 1,714 by March 2023. I must stress though that these officers and those that have recently joined need considerable support, supervision and training for them to be able to add real value to our communities.
  • Support for our police officers – as a result of the overall increase in officers, investment is needed to support and sustain the entire workforce. This includes areas such as HR, ICT, Professional Standards and incorporates both an investment in police officer and police staff roles.  Specifically, support within Occupational Health, the Recruitment Team, Operational Training, Resource Management, Call Taking and importantly ensuring an inclusive approach from a workforce that is representative of the communities it serves.

 

New Investment

  • Digital Investigative Support – to provide expert digital evidence and support to robustly enforce against those who blight our communities through county lines, serious and organised crime, drug supply and those who exploit the online space to cause serious harm – something I know people want to see.
  • Additional cyber investigators – the growing prevalence of cybercrime causes untold financial and emotional harm to businesses and individuals alike. This investment will enhance our response to the threat through specialist investigators.
  • Young Person Early Intervention Officers – supporting the Constabulary’s response to vulnerability, the continuation of this innovative pilot provides early intervention to young people following their initial missing from home episodes, engaging with those who are most vulnerable to exploitation, providing personalised interventions and preventative measures to protect them from further future harm and causing harm to others.
  • Violence against Women and Girls – increased investment in resources, such as a vulnerability analyst to identify and support the Constabulary to tackle those who perpetrate violence in our communities – a national priority for all forces as well as here. We want to ensure people feel safe on our streets.
  • Digital Innovation – following the Government’s announcement that funding is being provided to increase productivity using enhanced technology and investigative tools, we will further invest in Digital Innovation to enable such opportunities to be identified and realised.

Maintaining Business as Usual

  • Increased business costs cannot be ignored – for example, projected pay costs (pay award/increments and national insurance), utility costs and fuel expenditure, building maintenance and capital investment, ICT systems costs, inflation and uncertainty about pensions. In addition, the Constabulary’s contributions to national programmes and on-going collaborations need to be met.

I would be grateful if you could take a few moments to complete the survey which you will find on my website: The Police & Crime Commissioner for Cambridgeshire | Consultations & Surveys (cambridgeshire-pcc.gov.uk)

Your views will help inform my final decision on how much to raise the policing part of the council tax.

The survey runs from 0:00 on 6thJanuary until 17:00 on 20th January 2022.

Household Support Fund

The Household Support Fund is a new fund that aims to help those individuals struggling to pay for food, energy or other essential items this winter.

Cambridgeshire County Council has been allocated £3.58 million and Peterborough City Council has been allocated £1,824,656 as part of the Government’s Household Support Fund to help people who need financial support.

The wider scheme will provide two primary routes for households to get the support they need; a direct application process and support facilitated via a trusted partner network.

Practical support that can be provided through the fund includes:

  • A supermarket voucher to support with food for both families and individuals.
  • Energy fuel and Water, either by paying bills on-demand, via direct debit, or a pre-payment meter.
  • Other essential supplies

Check here for more information and to make a referral : https://www.cambridgeshire.gov.uk/residents/coronavirus/household-support-fund

What’s in a number?

 

 

Keith Johnson

Hunts Forum Senior Development Officer

 

 

Recently, I was talking with someone who wanted me to tell them if they had been conned as they had given money to what they thought was a charity, but turned out to be a private company. Or rather, a not-for-profit private company. They had checked, so they thought, but had mistaken a company number for a charity number.

What do these numbers mean? And does having only a company number mean that the donation hasn’t gone to a worthy cause?

When a charity registers with the Charity Commission it is given a number it’s Charity number. 1 When you see a charity number you can be assured that the Charity Commission has agreed that the purposes (Objects) of the organisation are entirely charitable. The organisation now has to provide a set of annual accounts, the trustees must write an annual report that details how the work of the charity has been for public benefit. The Charity Commission regulates the activities of the charity and how it is run.

To be a charity in England and Wales the organisation must satisfy the definition of a charity in the Charities Act

The Charities Act says that a ‘charity’ is an organisation which

  • is established for charitable purposes only and
  • is subject to the control of the High Court’s charity law jurisdiction

What if a group calls itself a charity, but doesn’t have a charity number?

Firstly, it is important to understand that many legal structures (a charity is of itself not a legal structure, but exactly what these are is beyond the scope of this short piece) cannot register with the Charity Commission until they reach an income threshold- currently £5,000 annual income.  If the organisation has only charitable purposes, then in law it is a charity even if it does not refer to itself as such. There are innumerable small, unregistered charities in the UK that operate without ever reaching the income threshold that would allow them to register. They do amazing work in their communities.

The main thing that both registered and unregistered charities have in common is that they are run by volunteers- trustees. Trustees cannot be paid.

Some Charities are also registered limited companies. This means that they are registered with Companies House as well as the Charity Commission and have to file annual reports to both regulators. By becoming Charitable Companies, Charities can provide their trustees with limited liability and enter into contracts as a separate legal entity. They are still run by volunteer trustees, but some of these will also be directors of the limited company- they remain unpaid.

However, there are many organisations who do similar work to Charities and Charitable Companies, but that are not themselves a charity.

There are a growing number of Social Enterprises. These can come in many forms which I cannot go into detail with at the moment, but they can range from straightforward sole traders and partnerships, through to limited companies, co-ops and Community Interest Companies and more.  A common aspect for all is that they are businesses that aim to make a profit, but also have a social purpose.

It is what a social enterprise does with its profit that makes them different to a mainstream business. A social enterprise will either reinvest that profit into the social side of the work that they do or donate that profit to create social change- sometimes both. Although generating income from trading in goods or services, many social enterprises will also fundraise by asking supporters for donations or even apply for grants in the same way as a charity. However, many forms of social enterprise are ineligible to apply for most grant funding and so may rely on trading and supporter donations.

Social Enterprise UK states that a social enterprise “must generate the majority (more than 50%)  of  their  income through trade.”2

Just like with Charities, not all will have a company number. However, many will. If the social enterprise is a company limited by guarantee or by shares, they will be registered with and regulated by Companies House and have a company number. Co-ops and Community Benefit Societies will be registered with and regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority and have a registration number that can be checked on the Mutuals Register. 3

An increasingly popular form of social enterprise is a Community Interest Company (CIC). This is a company limited by Guarantee or by Shares registered with Companies House and also with the CIC regulator. The CIC regulator ensures that the company is operating in the Community Interest and the company has to provide an annual Community Interest Company Report to the regulator that can read on the CICs Companies House filings. It is, however, a very light touch regulator, especially when compared with the Charity Commission.

Unlike charities, which although they may have paid staff are ultimately run by a board of unpaid volunteer trustees, social enterprises can pay the people who run the business and so is popular with people who want to address a community need, but also earn an income at the same time. If limited by shares, they can also raise funds by issuing shares and pay dividends to shareholders.

Many social enterprises have chosen not to be a charity so that they can be more flexible, nimble, responsive, impactful and perhaps more political in their approach to a social need. No social enterprise should ever refer to itself as a charity or as charitable. If they do, they are at best being disingenuous- perhaps intentionally, but far more likely due to ignorance on the part of those running them.

Displaying Company and Charity information

If a charity is registered with the charity commission it must display its registered name and address on its website, in emails, promotional material, etc. most choose to also provide their charity number. Charitable companies are registered with Companies House as well as the Charity Commission and so file accounts to both regulators and have a company number as well as a charity number. Companies, including Community Interest Companies, must display the name, address and company number.

Being confident in our donation

If, like my friend, you wish to give money to a company claiming a social purpose, remember you can check up on their activities on the Companies House website.4 As we have seen, just because they are a company does not mean that anyone is pulling a fast one. There are many companies doing great community work. If you support the cause and wish to give, you can confidently support a company just as much as a charity. But if you are concerned, find out more about them before you give- check on the Charity Commission website for information about charities, on the mutuals register for co-ops and CBS and on the Companies House website for information on companies, including CICs.

Know who is regulating the organisation you are giving to. Make use of the Charity, Mutual or Company number to give you confidence in the organisation you are giving. And if they don’t have a number, at least now you may have some idea why that might be.

 

Footnotes

 

Follow on consultation for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Children and Young People’s Mental Health Strategy

We received the below information regarding some events happening around Planning Events on the new Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Children and Young People’s Mental Health Strategy.


Please find attached (Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Children and Young People’s Mental Health Strategy Planning Events Info)and below the booking links for the Cambridgeshire and Peterborough Children and Young People’s Mental Health Strategy Planning Events taking place in January 2022. Please note that these events are now ONLINE events and not face to face events.

 

Existing ticket holders: If you have previously booked onto one of the events, you do not need to do anything. You will be sent a link to attend the online session which replaces the face to face event (times and dates will remain the same)

If you have not booked: Please secure your place at one of the online events using the booking links below or attached within the flyer.

 

Get involved in planning mental health services for children and young people in Cambridgeshire and Peterborough

There will be a new Children and Young People’s mental health strategy for Cambridgeshire and Peterborough from April 2022. This will be a plan which tells us how services and projects will help children and young people aged 0 to 25 who have mental health problems. The strategy will be owned and shared by the Children and Young People’s Mental Health and Wellbeing Board as part of the wider mental health system.

An organisation called taproot is running discussion events to engage local people with deciding the priorities of the strategy. The events are open to professionals, service leads, parents/carers and young people (as long as they are appropriately supported to take part by an accompanying adult). Attendees will be sent relevant information before they come. To book tickets, follow the booking links in the table below.

 

Date  Location  Time  Booking link 
12th January 2022  ONLINE

Via Zoom

6:30pm to 9pm Book tickets
13th January 2022  ONLINE

Via Zoom

4:00pm to 7pm Book tickets
17th January 2022  ONLINE

Via Zoom

1:30pm to 4:30pm Book tickets
19th January 2022  ONLINE

Via Zoom

1:30pm to 4:30pm Book tickets
20th January 2022  ONLINE

Via Zoom

1:30pm to 4:30pm Book tickets

If you have any questions about the events, or about the strategy process, please contact ben@taproot.org.uk

Change to HR Law

Did you know that there has been a change to HR Employment Law?

Employees only need to provide a sick certificate if they are off sick for more than 28 days. This is effective as of now and is due to stop on 27th January. For more information visit this article.

https://www.mccabeandco.com/news/emergency-changes-to-self-certify-sickness/ 

Government website can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/statutory-sick-pay-employee-fitness-to-work.

ICS December Newsletter

As the Integrated Care System (ICS) develops, there have been many advances. To keep you all in the loop, please find the latest newsletter explaining how the transition is progressing, while also announcing the appointment of the CEO designate and critical programmes of work that will be going ahead in the new year.

Click here or on the image below

 

Volunteers needed for Vaccination Programme

The CCG continue to recruit volunteer staff to support the biggest and fastest vaccination programme in the history of the NHS. They have asked that the VCS share the below information with their communities.

 

There is an urgent need for volunteer stewards (RVS) and volunteer unregistered vaccinators (St Johns Ambulance) locally to support the vaccine programme.

Stewards

Stewards help and guide people at vaccination sites – this could be at a GP Vaccination Hub, a Large Scale Vaccination Centre, or at Pharmacy vaccination sites.

Anyone interested in volunteering for the steward role is asked to sign up via the Royal Voluntary Service website.  Volunteers are asked to commit to at least 2 shifts at a vaccination site each month. Shifts are up to 4 hours long.

Once registered (takes approx. 48 hours) volunteers will be notified of available shifts via text and email alerts.  Volunteers are then able to confirm which shifts they are able to do.

All vaccination sites (GP hubs, Vaccination Centres and Pharmacies) will advertise their available shifts through the Royal Voluntary Service website.

A DBS is not required for this role, although volunteers will be asked to declare any unspent convictions as part of the application process.

Unregistered vaccinators

Anyone interested in volunteering for the unregistered vaccinators is asked to complete the ‘expression of interest’ on the St Johns Ambulance website.  Unregistered vaccinators administer vaccines under clinical supervision – these roles require training and assessment.

Volunteers can sign up for both options if they choose to do so.

Omicron – VCS Gets Ready

Updated on 13/12/2021

A note from Julie Farrow, CEO at Hunts Forum. She recently was contacted by the CCG regarding government announcement and the support VCS can offer with the vaccine role out.

 

Dear Colleagues

Following the announcement yesterday of the increase in vaccinations required to stem the wave of Omicron, I writing to you to ask you to ‘be ready’ for a potential call to support the vaccination effort. 

WHAT CAN VCS DO?

Now

CCG has put a call out for volunteers via the national Volunteer Scheme for more volunteers: https://nhsvolunteerresponders.org.uk/i-want-to-volunteer/volunteer-roles/steward-volunteer. Would you please promote this amongst your networks?

Moving forward

We are unsure if  the National Volunteer Scheme will meet demand.  It is prudent to ask VCS groups in Cambridgeshire to also think about what they can do to support either by signposting existing volunteers to NHS Responders or

  • Assessing your capacity to manage staff and volunteers
  • Identify staff and volunteers willing/able to help (marshalling, admin)
  • Identify staff and volunteers willing to become untrained vaccinators (need an enhanced DBS check and 2 days training)
  • Have your response ready – Yes we can help – No we don’t have capacity

Things are moving very quickly and there is genuine concern that health may come under pressure.

Please do watch out for more details as soon as I know more, I’ll be in touch.

Steward Volunteer (COVID-19 vaccinations)

Considering becoming a Steward Volunteer for NHS Volunteer Responders? Find out more about the responsibilities of the role and how to sign up.

Steward Volunteer (COVID-19 vaccinations)

Considering becoming a Steward Volunteer for NHS Volunteer Responders? Find out more about the responsibilities of the role and how to sign up.

 Take care

Julie

 

Is there anything wrong with this page?

Help us improve our website